Platonic traditions

Kabbalah, Sufism, Gnosticism and other forms of mysticism rooted in Christianity, Judaism, Islam
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Nicholas
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Platonic traditions

Postby Nicholas » Thu Jul 07, 2016 6:04 pm

Here is one good source, seeing Platonic thought in many other traditions too.

http://www.platonic-philosophy.org/library_topic.html
Last edited by Nicholas on Sun Dec 25, 2016 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
How grand indeed shines the light of truth upon the face of the man whose heart is enlightened by the sense of his oneness with all; and what pathos there is when the sense of separateness drives him away from his oneness with other men.

G. de Purucker

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Nicholas
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Re: Platonic traditions

Postby Nicholas » Thu Jul 07, 2016 6:26 pm

A serious introduction to Plato by a true Platonist of recent times, Thomas Taylor:

http://www.prometheustrust.co.uk/Thomas_Taylors_intro_to_Plato.pdf

"Philosophy," says Hierocles, "is the purification and perfection of human life. It is the purification, indeed, from material irrationality, and the mortal body; but the perfection, in consequence of being the resumption of our proper felicity, and a reascent to the divine likeness. To effect these two is the province of Virtue and Truth; the former exterminating the immoderation of the passions; and the latter introducing the divine form to those who are naturally adapted to its reception."

Of philosophy thus defined, which may be compared to a luminous pyramid, terminating in Deity, and having for its basis the rational soul of man and its spontaneous unperverted conceptions, - of this philosophy, august, magnificent, and divine, Plato may be justly called the primary leader and hierophant, through whom, like the mystic light in the inmost recesses of some sacred temple, it first shone forth with occult and venerable splendour. It may indeed be truly said of the whole of this philosophy, that it is the greatest good which man can participate: for if it purifies us from the defilements of the passions and assimilates us to Divinity, it confers on us the proper felicity of our nature.
Last edited by Nicholas on Sun Dec 25, 2016 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
How grand indeed shines the light of truth upon the face of the man whose heart is enlightened by the sense of his oneness with all; and what pathos there is when the sense of separateness drives him away from his oneness with other men.

G. de Purucker

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Nicholas
Posts: 383
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Platonic traditions

Postby Nicholas » Sat Sep 10, 2016 12:07 am

This Collected Works of the American Platonist Thomas M. Johnson is 400 or so pages of uplifting and wise translations and some original writings by Johnson. The Exhortation to Philosophy by Iamblichus is splendid and the only translation into English, so far.

In hardback for about $32 from Amazon.

http://www.prometheustrust.co.uk/html/other_books.html#tmj
Last edited by Nicholas on Sun Dec 25, 2016 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
How grand indeed shines the light of truth upon the face of the man whose heart is enlightened by the sense of his oneness with all; and what pathos there is when the sense of separateness drives him away from his oneness with other men.

G. de Purucker

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Nicholas
Posts: 383
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Platonic traditions

Postby Nicholas » Sat Dec 24, 2016 5:50 pm

This excellent commentary on Plato's Meno is a good thinker's introduction to the Platonic path:

The Virtue of Recollection in Platos Meno.pdf
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How grand indeed shines the light of truth upon the face of the man whose heart is enlightened by the sense of his oneness with all; and what pathos there is when the sense of separateness drives him away from his oneness with other men.

G. de Purucker

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Nicholas
Posts: 383
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Vision of Er

Postby Nicholas » Sat Feb 11, 2017 10:41 pm

This ancient Vision of Er is by Plato, from his Republic. It is the near-death experience of a warrior from before Plato's time. Helpful notes and Introduction are included:

http://www.dailytheosophy.net/01-1-introduction-to-theosophy/articles-on-theosophy/01-2-cycles-of-birth-and-death/ancient-extended-near-death-experience-vision-er/#footnote_5_25073
How grand indeed shines the light of truth upon the face of the man whose heart is enlightened by the sense of his oneness with all; and what pathos there is when the sense of separateness drives him away from his oneness with other men.

G. de Purucker


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