Mahabharata

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Nicholas
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Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Mon Oct 24, 2016 1:51 am

A major, as in size and influence, source for Indian philosophy and religion. Here is a complete English version by the devoted translator, Babu Kisari Mohan Ganguli:

http://www.holybooks.com/wp-content/upl ... anguli.pdf

Gutenberg has e-book versions too; printed books in 4 or 12 volumes of this translation are also available.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by DNS » Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:54 pm

Holy Cow!

5,818 pages! I knew it was big but didn't know it was that large.

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Mon Oct 24, 2016 5:17 pm

Another complete version, from the critical Sanskrit edition, is now available in ten paperback volumes, translated by Bibek Debroy, from Penguin books India. The critical edition is bit shorter and Debroy's translation is more accurate than Ganguli's.

One section from volume four deals with the blind king Dhritarashtra who cannot sleep because he is worried about what Yudhishthira might say - war or compromise or capitulation. So he summons the sage Vidura for advice on dharma in general. The section is over 40 pages long.
Vidura said, One who does not serve that which is censured, is praised. He is not an atheist and has faith. These are the signs of one who is learned.
One who does not deviate from his objective because of anger, joy, pride, false modesty and a false sense of vanity, is regarded as learned.
One whose planned deeds and counsel are not known to others, but are known only after the tasks have been executed, is regarded as learned.
He whose deeds are not obstructed by cold and heat, fear and affection, prosperity and adversity, is regarded as learned.
One who wisely follows dharma and artha, and artha over kama for the sake of the hereafter, is regarded as learned. They exert to the best of their ability. They act to the best of their ability. They disregard nothing. O bull among the Bharata lineage! Such men are regarded as learned.
Dharma - Religion, duty.
Artha - Wealth. But in general, any object of the senses.
Kama - Desire.
Last edited by Nicholas on Mon Nov 07, 2016 3:11 am, edited 2 times in total.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by No_Mind » Mon Oct 24, 2016 11:33 pm

David N. Snyder wrote:Holy Cow!

5,818 pages! I knew it was big but didn't know it was that large.
You could try out C. Rajagopalchari's abridged version http://www.gita-society.com/section3/mahabharata.pdf

It is only 217 pages and quite accurate.

This is the Kuru Family Tree, around which the story revolves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuru_King ... amily_Tree

and further notes on the family tree http://read-kushal.blogspot.in/2013/01/ ... amily.html

One important fact .. though Kisari Mohan Ganguli's version is huge it provides The Gita (Book 6: Bhishma Parva --> Bhagavat-Gita Parva --> Section XXV to XLII; it is best to read whole Bhishma Parva to understand the context in which Sri Krishna narrated The Gita) in reasonable detail in only about 60 pages. Good gist of the Gita.
May the Force be with you

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Fri Nov 11, 2016 8:04 pm

Many parts of the Mahabharata are studied as separate works. The Bhagavad-Gita is the most famous, but before the teaching given in the war setting, the Sage Vidura's advice is also called the Vidura-Gita. An excerpt was given above.

Yet after the war, Arjuna told Krishna he had forgotten much of what he was taught in the Bhagavad-Gita. Krishna was not pleased and upbraided him for poor concentration. Krishna said he was not going to repeat was he said before, but would give him an ancient teaching from a Siddha (Perfected One). This section of the Mahabharata is called the Anugita-Parva. Here is a translation by K.T. Telang done for the Sacred Books of the East series at the end of the 19th century.

http://www.universaltheosophy.com/pdf-l ... _KTT_2.pdf
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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Lucas Oliveira » Fri Nov 11, 2016 9:34 pm

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Fri May 26, 2017 1:34 am

I shall tell thee those acts by which Jiva, O best of men, while coursing through a repeated round of re-births, becomes happy:

Gifts, observances of austerity, Brahmacharyya, bearing Brahman according to the ordinances laid down, self-restraint, tranquillity, compassion for all creatures, restraint of passions, abstentions from cruelty, as also from appropriating what belongs to others, refraining from doing even mentally all acts that are false and injurious to living creatures on the Earth, reverently serving mother and father, honouring deities and guests, worship of preceptors, pity, purity, constant restraint of all organs, and causing of all good acts, are said to constitute the conduct of the good.

From observance of such conduct, arises Righteousness which protects all creatures eternally. Such conduct one would always behold among persons that are good. Verily, such conduct resides there eternally. That course of practices to which persons of tranquil souls adhere indicates Righteousness. Among them is thrown that course of practices which constitutes eternal Righteousness. He who would betake himself to that Righteousness would never have to attain to a miserable end. It is by the conduct of the good that the world is restrained in the paths of Righteousness when it falls away.
Anu Gita section, also known as Uttarta Gita
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:11 pm

When this universe was without brightness and without light and everything was enveloped in darkness on all sides, the great egg came into being. This was the inexhaustible seed of all creatures and was created at the beginning of all the eras. It is said that in this divine cause existed the eternal brahman, true and resplendent—wonderful and beyond imagination and perfectly balanced everywhere. This was the subtle un-manifested cause. It was that which exists and that which does not. From this was born the one and only Lord Prajapati, known as Brahma, the preceptor of the gods. He is also known as Sthanu, Manu, Ka and Parameshthin. From him was born Daksha, the son of Prachetas, and Daksha’s seven sons, and the twenty-one prajapatis. Him whom all the sages know as the being who cannot be fathomed was also born, as were the vishvadevas, the adityas, the vasus and the ashvins. Yakshas, saddhyas, pishachas, guhyakas and the pitris were born and after that were born the learned, holy and superior brahmarshis. Then were born many rajarshis, endowed with every noble quality. The water, heaven, earth, wind, sky and the directions, the years seasons, months, fortnight, day and night, followed in succession. The world witnessed everything else that came forth. When the world is immersed in the decay of the era, everything that can be seen, movable and immovable, is again brought together. As the season changes, signs of the season can be seen. Like that, at the beginning of another era, everything is produced again. Without beginning and without end, the wheel of existence rolls on eternally in this world, causing creation and destruction, without beginning and without end.
Excerpt From: Bibek Debroy; Mahabharata Volume 1
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Sat Feb 17, 2018 4:32 pm

Truth
The Mahabharata
Santi Parva, Section CLXII
Translated by Sri Kisari Mohan Ganguli
Yudhishthira said: Brahmanas and Rishis and Pitris and the gods all applaud the duty of truth. I desire to hear of truth. Discourse to me upon it, O grandsire! What are the indications, O king, of truth? How may it be acquired? What is gained by practising truth, and how? Tell me all this.

Bhishma said: A confusion of the duties of the four orders is never applauded. That which is called Truth always exists in a pure and unmingled state in every one of those four orders. With those that are good, Truth is always a duty. Indeed, Truth is an eternal duty. One should reverentially bow unto Truth. Truth is the highest refuge (of all). Truth is duty; Truth is penance; Truth is Yoga; and Truth is the eternal Brahman. Truth has been said to be Sacrifice of a higher order. Everything rests upon Truth. I shall now tell thee the forms of Truths one after another, and its indications also in due order. It behoveth thee to hear also as to how Truth may be acquired.

Truth, O Bharata, as it exists in all the world, is of thirteen kinds. The forms that Truth assumes are impartiality, self-control, forgiveness, modesty, endurance, goodness, renunciation, contemplation, dignity, fortitude, compassion, and abstention from injury. These, O great monarch, are the thirteen forms of Truth. Truth is immutable, eternal, and unchangeable. It may be acquired through practices which do not militate against any of the other virtues. It may also be acquired through Yoga.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Sat Feb 17, 2018 5:51 pm

Using Debroy's recent translation from volume 8:
In all the worlds, there are thirteen kinds of truth. There is no doubt that truth is impartiality and self-control. There is also lack of malice, forgiveness, modesty, patience, lack of envy, renunciation, meditation, wisdom, fortitude, constant adherence and non-violence.

There must be impartiality towards the desirable and the undesirable, towards one’s own self and towards the enemy. When preference and aversion are destroyed, desire and anger are also destroyed. Self-control means one doesn’t desire the possessions of others. There is always patience and gravity. There is fearlessness and the pacification of anger. All of these are obtained through knowledge. The learned say that lack of malice manifests itself in generosity and control in the practice of dharma. Those who always base themselves on the truth do not suffer from malice. The virtuous person forgives everyone—those who should be forgiven and those who should not be forgiven, those who are liked and those who are not liked. The virtuous obtain the truth. They do good in secret ways. The modest person never boasts. The dharma of modesty can always be obtained through restraint in speech. The form of forgiveness that is indulged in for the sake of dharma or artha is said to be endurance. This is for the propagation of the worlds and is obtained through patience. If a person renounces affection, if a person renounces objects and if a person gives up love and hatred, he becomes one who renounces—not otherwise. If a person makes efforts to undertake good deeds, without making it obvious and without any attachment, that is said to be nobility among beings. There is fortitude when one does not perform perverse deeds, whether it is in a situation of happiness or unhappiness. A wise person who desires his own prosperity must always pursue this. One must always have sentiments of being forgiving. One must be devoted to the truth. Devoid of delight, fear and anger, a learned person obtains fortitude. Lack of hatred towards all beings, in deeds, thought and words, kindness and generosity—these are the eternal dharma of the virtuous.

These are the thirteen separate characteristics of the truth. O descendant of the Bharata lineage! These forms of truth are worshipped and extended. O descendant of the Bharata lineage! It is impossible to speak about the infinite qualities of the truth. That is the reason truth is praised by the brahmanas, the ancestors and the gods. There is no dharma superior to the truth. There is no sin that is worse than falsehood. Truth is the foundation of dharma. That is the reason truth must not be destroyed.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:06 pm

Bhishma praises Krishna:
Lying down on that bed of arrows, he joined his hands in salutation and worshipped Krishna. In a loud voice, he praised Madhusudana, the lord of yoga, Padmanabha, Vishnu, Jishnu, the lord of the universe. He joined his hands in salutation and purified himself. Bhishma was supreme among eloquent ones and had great dharma in his soul. He praised the lord Vasudeva. “O Krishna! I wish to worship you. O Purushottama! May you be pleased with my words, which will be both brief and extensive. You are pure. You are the essence of purity. You are the swan. You are supreme. You are the supreme creator. You are in all atmans and you are the lord of beings. You enter and are established in all beings in the universe. You are the qualities in beings. You are the lord of qualities, like a string which holds gems together. Your limbs constitute the universe. You perform deeds in the universe. Everything in the universe is strung together in you, like a garland strung together by a firm thread. You are Hari. You are the one with one thousand heads. You are the one with one thousand feet and one thousand eyes. You are known as the god Narayana. You are the refuge of the universe.”
Excerpt From: Debroy trans. Volume 8, chapter 1375
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jun 23, 2018 12:51 am

Here is a site devoted to Mahabharata research. Scientists may have found underwater, the ancient city of Krishna - Dwarka. Also other cities that go back 9000 years.

http://mahabharata-research.com/about%2 ... warka.html
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Kali Yuga

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:32 pm

Our time has many clear signs of human ethical degeneration. According to ancient India this is a recurring dark cycle called Kali Yuga. Here is a list of symptoms:

https://mailchi.mp/exoticindia/hindu-te ... 1e463501ce
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Re: Kali Yuga

Post by DNS » Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:17 am

Nicholas wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:32 pm
Our time has many clear signs of human ethical degeneration. According to ancient India this is a recurring dark cycle called Kali Yuga. Here is a list of symptoms:

https://mailchi.mp/exoticindia/hindu-te ... 1e463501ce
Most of the things on that list have come true. For example:
1). People will not think twice before cutting down trees or destroying groves.
3). Even though having the outward appearance of saints, people will indulge in trade and commercial activity.
4). During Kaliyuga a man will be friends only with his wife.
In this socially isolated times, many men do only make friends with their wife.
21). Because of the shortage of cows, people will resort to drinking goat and sheep-milk.
This one has not happened and it is not likely that it will happen due to factory farming, breeding of livestock, etc.
53). The highest purpose of life will be to fill one's belly.
:D Looks to be fairly accurate, with a huge rise in obesity in the developed world.
57). Houses will be desolate because of the lack of chanting of Vedas and absence of guests.
Again, perhaps due to social isolation, social media, etc, this appears to be true too.

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Re: Mahabharata

Post by Lucas Oliveira » Sun Jul 15, 2018 5:20 pm



:namaste:
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