Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Kabbalah, Sufism, Gnosticism and other forms of mysticism rooted in Christianity, Judaism, Islam
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Ursus Maritimus
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Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Post by Ursus Maritimus » Sun Jul 21, 2019 7:01 pm

A fascinating article taking a look at renunciation in the fairly early period of Christian monasticism. At some point I might like to start a comparative renunciation thread.

The article begins:
Renunciation of material possessions is one of the most essential aspects of monastic life in all traditions, eastern and western, primitive and recent.[2]

In this paper we shall study it in one of the most ancient forms of com­munity life in Christianity, the Pachomian cenobitism of the fourth century.


http://www.scourmont.be/Armand/writings ... iation.htm
:anjali:
If by renouncing a lesser happiness one may realize a greater happiness, let the wise man renounce the lesser, having regard for the greater. - Dhp 290

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Ursus Maritimus
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Re: Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Post by Ursus Maritimus » Sun Jul 21, 2019 7:03 pm

This is their equipment: two linen tunics plus the one already worn, a long scarf for the neck and shoulders, a goat skin hanging from the shoulders, shoes, two hoods, a belt and a staff. If you find anything more than this, you shall take it away without contradiction.
If by renouncing a lesser happiness one may realize a greater happiness, let the wise man renounce the lesser, having regard for the greater. - Dhp 290

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DNS
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Re: Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Post by DNS » Sat Jul 27, 2019 4:48 am

The ancient Hebrew/Jewish Nazarites may have been a pre-cursor to the Christian ascetics. Note the name is even similar to Nazarene and Jesus and the Apostles appear to have been somewhat ascetic (no known wives, devoting their lives to Jesus and missionary work).
In the Hebrew Bible, a nazirite or nazarite is one who voluntarily took a vow described in Numbers 6:1–21. "Nazarite" comes from the Hebrew word נזיר nazir meaning "consecrated" or "separated".[1] This vow required the person to:

Abstain from all alcohol derived from grapes. (Traditional Rabbinic authorities state that all other types of alcohol were permitted.)
Refrain from cutting the hair on one's head; but to allow the locks of the head's hair to grow.[2]
Not to become ritually impure by contact with corpses or graves, even those of family members.[3]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazirite

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Ursus Maritimus
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Re: Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Post by Ursus Maritimus » Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:56 am

Cool, I’m not super familiar with all the strains of Judaism but iirc from the Old Testament Elijah or Ezekiel lived in a cave which is pretty hermit like. And then there was a sort of ascetic community that wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls I believe. I forget what they were called.

:anjali:
If by renouncing a lesser happiness one may realize a greater happiness, let the wise man renounce the lesser, having regard for the greater. - Dhp 290

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Re: Renunciation of Material Possessions in Pachomian Cenobitism

Post by DNS » Sun Jul 28, 2019 4:02 am

Ursus Maritimus wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 12:56 am
Cool, I’m not super familiar with all the strains of Judaism but iirc from the Old Testament Elijah or Ezekiel lived in a cave which is pretty hermit like. And then there was a sort of ascetic community that wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls I believe. I forget what they were called.

:anjali:
Correct, the Essenes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essenes

Some believe Jesus was with the Essenes during his lost years. The Essenes were vegetarian and liked healing practices.
The accounts by Josephus and Philo show that the Essenes led a strictly communal life—often compared to later Christian monasticism.[35] Many of the Essene groups appear to have been celibate, but Josephus speaks also of another “order of Essenes” that observed the practice of being engaged for three years and then becoming married.[36] According to Josephus, they had customs and observances such as collective ownership,[37][38] electing a leader to attend to the interests of the group, and obedience to the orders from their leader.[39] Also, they were forbidden from swearing oaths[40] and from sacrificing animals.[41] They controlled their tempers and served as channels of peace,[40] carrying weapons only for protection against robbers.[42] The Essenes chose not to possess slaves but served each other[43] and, as a result of communal ownership, did not engage in trading.[44] Josephus and Philo provide lengthy accounts of their communal meetings, meals and religious celebrations.

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