Chinese Buddhism

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Nicholas
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Chinese Buddhism

Post by Nicholas » Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:29 am

A recent Master outlines the basics in this small book.
Orthodox Chinese Buddhism.pdf
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Last edited by Nicholas on Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by Nicholas » Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:26 pm

Here is how it begins:
1.1 What Are Orthodox Buddhist Beliefs and Practices?

In Buddhism itself, there is no distinction between orthodox and superstitious,
since the fundamental teachings are the same everywhere.
Buddhism flows out from the sea of wisdom and compassion that was
engendered by Śākyamuni, the enlightened Buddha. Its teachings are
full of wisdom, kindness, radiance, comfort, freshness, and coolness.
Buddhism as a religion is alive in the communities that have been
established based on the Buddha’s teachings.

The term orthodox Buddhism implies correct faith, proper vows,
right understanding, upright behavior, and genuine trust. Such authentic
faith should be placed in teachings that are (1) timeless, (2) universal,
and (3) necessary. In other words, the teachings should have always
been true in the past, should be true everywhere in the present, and
should infallibly be true in the future.

Faith or reliance on a principle or a thing that fails to meet these
three criteria is not correct faith and is therefore superstition. If a
religion’s doctrines cannot stand the test of time, are incompatible with
the environment, or cannot further develop in the face of change, the
religion is superstitious.

It cannot be denied that in regions where Mahāyāna [lit. “Great
Vehicle”] Buddhism is practiced, especially in China, authentic Buddhism
has largely been the privilege of isolated, eminent monks and
small numbers of gentry-scholars. Buddhism has seldom been correctly
understood and practiced by the general populace, whose religious
practice is actually a potpourri of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism.
For instance, practices such as worshipping gods and ghosts,
and beliefs that people automatically become ghosts after death, are
not Buddhist teachings.
Last edited by Nicholas on Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Mahayana

Post by Nicholas » Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:33 pm

Perhaps the most influential sutra for the Chinese is the Avatamsaka Sutra, called Hua-yen in Chinese. Great bodhisattvas were produced from practicing the buddhadharma found in this sutra and the shastras based on it.

Here is one quote from one of the founders of this school, Master Fa Zang (643-712):
The deluded claim that the false is true, but they fail to see the truth in the falsity; the enlightened see that the false is not true, and so they are able to see the truth in falsity.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Iconodule
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Re: Chinese Mahayana

Post by Iconodule » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:03 pm

The struggle against Chinese syncretism among Chinese Buddhists seems to be quite an uphill climb. I suspect most teachers don't even bother.
The ladder that leads to the Kingdom is hidden within you, and is found in your soul. Dive into yourself, and in your soul you will discover the rungs by which you are to ascend. - St. Isaac of Syria

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Mahayana

Post by Nicholas » Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:24 pm

Iconodule wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:03 pm
The struggle against Chinese syncretism among Chinese Buddhists seems to be quite an uphill climb. I suspect most teachers don't even bother.
Correct. When in the 5th? century, translators finally noticed that Daoist terms did not really fit the Dharma, there was a correction. But then and now, if an ancient Chinese notion will support the buddhadharma it will be quoted and used.
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by Nicholas » Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:28 pm

Thanks to a healing by Kuan Shr Yin Bodhisattva, this gentleman compiled a good review of Chinese popular Buddhism:

http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/ancientsgrfx.pdf
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by sindyciaray » Tue Nov 07, 2017 8:04 am

It should be true everywhere in the present, and should infallibly be true in the future

KiwiNFLFan
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Re: Chinese Mahayana

Post by KiwiNFLFan » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:36 am

Iconodule wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:03 pm
The struggle against Chinese syncretism among Chinese Buddhists seems to be quite an uphill climb. I suspect most teachers don't even bother.
I lived in Malaysia for two years. The Chinese are one of the three major ethnic groups there (the other two being Malay and Indian). Your average Malaysian Chinese who is not Christian or Muslim will tick 'Buddhist' on the census but in reality many practice a combination of Buddhism and Chinese folk religion. There are Chinese Buddhist temples and "Chinese temples", the latter being places of worship for Chinese folk religion. Guanyin is worshipped alongside gods like Mazu (Goddess of the sea), Guan Yu and the Three Star Gods. When I worked at the University of Malaya, my boss there told me she was a "pure Buddhist" - i.e. she practiced Buddhism without Chinese folk religion.

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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by Iconodule » Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:44 pm

Yeah, my family is Malaysian Chinese and their Buddhism is definitely of this syncretic variety.
The ladder that leads to the Kingdom is hidden within you, and is found in your soul. Dive into yourself, and in your soul you will discover the rungs by which you are to ascend. - St. Isaac of Syria

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by Nicholas » Sun Mar 04, 2018 7:32 pm

Several talks given at the City of 10,000 Buddhas near Ukiah, California. The one on the Old Veteran shows the power of Kuan Yin bodhisattva, even when one has only a slight connection.

http://www.cttbusa.org/talks/talks_contents.asp
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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Nicholas
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Re: Chinese Buddhism

Post by Nicholas » Sat Jun 02, 2018 5:34 pm

A Dharma play about Bodhisattva Hsuan Tsang put on by youngsters at the City of 10000 Buddhas. It has music (with lyrics visible), dialogue & narration:

http://www.cttbusa.org/3cart_patriarch/ ... _play.html
Wholesome virtuous behavior progressively leads to the foremost. -- Buddha

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