Yoga Vasistha

includes modern movements; ISKCON, SRF, TM, etc.
User avatar
Nicholas
Posts: 1041
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Yoga Vasistha

Post by Nicholas » Fri Oct 26, 2018 1:02 am

More on the need for self-reliance:
The lazy man is worse than a donkey. One should never yield to laziness but strive to attain liberation, seeing that life is ebbing away every moment. Every day one must think of the impermanent body and struggle to conquer the animal nature. He must take recourse to association with good and virtuous people. One should not revel in the filth known as sense-pleasures, even as a worm revels in pus. By good deeds, good will return to you; by bad deeds, bad will return. Nowhere is there any God, fortune or fate. One who ignores his present ability for self-effort for fear of his past bad actions, might as well fear his own two arms, thinking them dangling vipers.

One who thinks that fate or God is directing him, is brainless and the goddess of fortune abandons him. Hence, by self-effort, discrimination, good association and study of the scriptures, acquire wisdom. Then realize that self-effort will end — in the direct realization of the truth. But ignoring, or going against the traditional injunctions, will not work. One should not try to create a gemstone from an ordinary pebble. Those who do not believe in the long practiced and experienced truths of the wise, but depend upon God, luck or destiny, are fools called the "living dead." If lazy dullness, this dreadful source of evil, were not found on this earth, who would ever be illiterate or poor? It is because lazy ones rely, life after life, on God or fortune that this earth is full of people who live like animals, miserable and poverty-stricken.
May all seek, find and follow the Path of selflessness.

User avatar
Nicholas
Posts: 1041
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Yoga Vasistha

Post by Nicholas » Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:19 pm

There are four methods of crossing over the ocean of worldly existence, namely Tranquillity {sama). Contentment {samtosa), Company of the good or the wise {sadhu-sanga), and Thinking {vicara). (II, 16, 18.) They are so related to one another that, if one of them is fully acquired, others will inevitably accompany it. One should, therefore, make effort in acquiring any one of them thoroughly. (II, 16, 22.)

From B.L. Atreya's big study, Philosophy of Yoga-Vasistha, page 136
May all seek, find and follow the Path of selflessness.

User avatar
Nicholas
Posts: 1041
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Yoga Vasistha

Post by Nicholas » Mon Oct 29, 2018 6:01 pm

One may also like The Vision and the Way of Vasistha a condensation by Atreya that was not put into English until recently. See Samvid's translation in the Samata Books edition which has the Sanskrit for each verse also. Also a good Introduction and detailed analysis of contents by Atreya.
May all seek, find and follow the Path of selflessness.

User avatar
Nicholas
Posts: 1041
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Yoga Vasistha

Post by Nicholas » Sun Nov 03, 2019 2:37 pm

Nicholas wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:31 pm
A readable online version, also available from Lulu as one volume book ($50 or so) or free Mobi or PDF formats:

http://yogavasishta.org/introduction.html
Some of the Glossary from this translation:
agnishtoma — an ancient Vedic ceremony performed by a brahmin desirous of obtaining heaven. The
ceremonies continue for five days with sixteen priests officiating.
akshauhini — an ancient battle formation of 21,870 chariots, 21,870 elephants, 65,610 cavalry, and 109,350 infantry.
Agastya — considered a Tamil/Vedic sage is one of the Seven Sages (Saptarishi). He is credited with
many mantras of the Rig Veda, and is also the author of Agastya Samhita (Agastya Collection). Once a
clan of demons hid in the Cosmic Ocean so the gods could not defeat them. The gods appealed to Agastya
who drank the entire ocean and held it within until the demons were destroyed.
amalaki — (Emblica Officinalis) Indian gooseberry, a small tree whose fruit, in Ayurvedic healing tradition, is considered the most powerful rejuvenating medicine.
Amaravati — the heavenly city of Indra, King of the Gods.
apsara — beautiful, supernatural women; nymphs. They are youthful and elegant, and proficient in the art
of dancing. They are the wives of the gandharvas, the court servants of Indra, the Lord of the Gods. They
dance to the music made by their husbands, usually in the palaces of the gods, and entertain gods and fallen heroes.
arghya — an offering of water as a token of respect.
Aruna — the god who serves as the charioteer of the Sun.
Arundhati — The wife of Vasishta.
asura — power-seeking deities, sometimes considered sinful and materialistic.
ativahika — In the Upanishads, refers to those who are deployed to carry the dead to the other world. Here, the meaning is the everlasting spiritual body.
Ayodhya — the capital of Kosala, the kingdom ruled by Dasharata.
May all seek, find and follow the Path of selflessness.

User avatar
Nicholas
Posts: 1041
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:21 pm
Location: California

Re: Yoga Vasistha

Post by Nicholas » Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:44 am

This translation is around 1800 pages. Here is a partial outline of the contents of 3 of the 6 books:
The Stories in Yoga Vasishta
Summary of and links to many of the stories in Yoga Vasishta.
References are to Book.Chapter.sloka.

Book I: On Detachment
King Arishtanemi
In this opening story of Yoga Vasishta, sage Agnivesya tells his son, Karunya the story of what Indra’s
heavenly messenger told the nymph, Suruchi, and it is the story of King Arishanemi who declines the offer
of Indra’s heaven because it is impermanent. Indra instructs the king to go to the ashram of sage Valmiki in
order to attain liberation by listening to Yoga Vasishta. (I.1.19)

Book II: The Aspirant Who Longs for Liberation
Shuka
Shuka as a child obtains the highest truth, but is uncertain of it. His father, sage Vyasa, sends him to the
royal sage King Janaka for instruction. Shuka becomes sage Shukadeva. (II.1.6-45)

Brahma Teaches Vasishta
Brahma reveals the nature of creation to his mind-born son, Vasishta. (II.10.10-44)

Book III: On Creation

Leela and Saraswati (Padma’s body on the shrine) — Queen Leela and King Padma lead an idyllic life,
but as they age Leela fears he might die first, in which case her own life would be intolerable. She does
tapas to Goddess Saraswati and obtains the boon to have her husband’s spirit always with her. She and
the goddess astral travel and time travel to see the couple’s prior life as simple brahmins when her
husband sees a lavish royal hunting party, creating a desire in him to possess the wealth of an empire.
That desire manifests after King Padma dies and the queen and goddess see another reality in the
deceased king’s mind. He is now King Viduratha ruling a vast empire with a second Leela as his wife (III.15-30) —

The Great War: Leela and Saraswati witness the great war between King Viduratha and his enemy King Sindhu. (III.31-39) —
Viduratha Awakens: Leela and Saraswati awaken Viduratha who remembers his past lives, including as the brahmin who wanted to possess the wealth of an empire. (III.40-41) —
Viduratha Killed: In the end, Sindhu wins, Viduratha is killed, and Sindhu rules. (III.43-51) --
Back to the Shrine; Nirvana: Saraswati instructs both Leelas, they return to King Viduranatha’s tomb in
the shrine, King Viduranatha-Padma is brought back to life in front of the two Leelas, and both Padma
(Viduratha) and the first Leela attain nirvana. (III.52-59) — There is a twist on the ending in Book VI, part 2. (VIB.156-157)
Karkati — Karkati (“Crab”) is a female demon (rakshasi) who performs powerful tapas and obtains the
boons to become Vishuchika (“Cholera”) and Suchi (“Needle”) so she can feast on mankind. Unsatisfied,
she does tapas again to regain her original form and learns from a king and his minister how to eat lawful food. (III.68-83)
The Ten Aindavas (Sons of Indu) — Indu and his wife perform tapas and receive the boon of having ten
sons. After their parents die, all ten complete tapas and attain the boon to become God the Creator, the
sole God of the Universe, at the same time. (III.86-87) — (See also VIB.178.26-48)
The Adulterous Lovers — Libertine Indra and Queen Ahalya, are discovered by King Indra who seeks
to punish them. Despite torture, the two lovers refuse to abandon each other. Cursed by sage Bharata, they
die and reincarnate together over many lifetimes until they perform tapas and attain liberation. This story
illustrates the power of belief. (III.89-90)
Deluded Men Punish Themselves — Men in a desert, club themselves, fall into pits and jump into thorny
brambles. They rest in shady groves, then resume the self-punishment. (III.98-99)
Three Non-Existent Princes — An old nurse makes up a story of three princes who never exist. (III.101)
King Lavana, a Magician and a Horse — The magician appears in King Lavana’s court and manifests a
magnificent horse. The king mounts the horse and disappears for a couple of hours. Upon his return, the
king explains that he had passed a lifetime married to a tribal woman, raising children. When his tribal
family died in a great famine, he was preparing to immolate himself when he woke up, found himself back
in his court, and realized the magician had put a spell on him. (III.104-109)
May all seek, find and follow the Path of selflessness.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests